Jim Zub

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Hard to believe it’s finally here: Wayward #1 arrives in comic shops today.
For the past 10 months, Steve and I have been developing this creator-owned series and it’s an incredible feeling to finally see it out in the world. We hope you read it, enjoy it, and tell others all about it.
Projects like this are not just one person and although it’s common for me to say “my new creator-owned book” that’s not accurate. Beyond the fact that Steve and I are co-creators on this, there are quite a number of people I need to thank for their involvement and support.
Steve Cummings, thank you for working alongside me to develop this story and drawing your heart out. Your incredible dedication shows on every page.John Rauch, thank you for enhancing Steve’s pages with incredible color and atmosphere.Marshall Dillon, thank you for always sticking with me and doing more proofs on this issue than any other project we’ve worked on together. You tirelessly made lettering edits right up until we went to press.Zack Davisson, thank you for your Japanese mythology consultation and wonderful essay back matter material.
Our variant cover artists: Alina Urusov, Jeff “Chamba” Cruz, Adam Warren, Tamra Bonvillain, Ross A. Campbell, Erik Larsen, Chip Zdarsky, and Kalman Andrasofszky. Thank you for creating eye-popping artwork to help grab attention, near and far.
Eric Stephenson, Ron Richards, Kat Salazar, Meredith Wallace, Addison Duke, Jonathon Chan, Branwyn Bigglestone and everyone else at the Image Comics office. Thank you for your support and your role as a creator-owned publisher that truly empowers creators to make the books they’ve always dreamed of.
Thank you also to:Charles Soule, for your invaluable advice and support.Nishi Makoto, for Japanese language/lettering help.Chris Butcher and the Beguiling, for arranging the Wayward launch party (happening tonight!).Brandon Seifert, for introducing me to Zack.
Thank you to the many retailers who have gone above and beyond the call of duty to support Wayward, including Happy Harbor Comics, Strange Adventures, Third Eye Comics, and the Phantom retail group.
Last but not least, thank you to my family and friends. Thank you for listening, sharing, understanding, and patiently accepting stressful days and neurotic nights as we built momentum to get this out the door. None of this would be possible without your love.
We’ve set up a fan email address where you can let us know what you think of Wayward (and we’re compiling the letters page for issue #2 this week, so please send us messages ASAP). Email waywardpostage@gmail.com and include “OK To Print” with your message if you’re okay with us possibly including your letter in a future issue.

Hard to believe it’s finally here: Wayward #1 arrives in comic shops today.

For the past 10 months, Steve and I have been developing this creator-owned series and it’s an incredible feeling to finally see it out in the world. We hope you read it, enjoy it, and tell others all about it.

Projects like this are not just one person and although it’s common for me to say “my new creator-owned book” that’s not accurate. Beyond the fact that Steve and I are co-creators on this, there are quite a number of people I need to thank for their involvement and support.

Steve Cummings, thank you for working alongside me to develop this story and drawing your heart out. Your incredible dedication shows on every page.
John Rauch, thank you for enhancing Steve’s pages with incredible color and atmosphere.
Marshall Dillon, thank you for always sticking with me and doing more proofs on this issue than any other project we’ve worked on together. You tirelessly made lettering edits right up until we went to press.
Zack Davisson, thank you for your Japanese mythology consultation and wonderful essay back matter material.

Our variant cover artists: Alina Urusov, Jeff “Chamba” Cruz, Adam Warren, Tamra Bonvillain, Ross A. Campbell, Erik Larsen, Chip Zdarsky, and Kalman Andrasofszky. Thank you for creating eye-popping artwork to help grab attention, near and far.

Eric Stephenson, Ron Richards, Kat Salazar, Meredith Wallace, Addison Duke, Jonathon Chan, Branwyn Bigglestone and everyone else at the Image Comics office. Thank you for your support and your role as a creator-owned publisher that truly empowers creators to make the books they’ve always dreamed of.

Thank you also to:
Charles Soule, for your invaluable advice and support.
Nishi Makoto, for Japanese language/lettering help.
Chris Butcher and the Beguiling, for arranging the Wayward launch party (happening tonight!).
Brandon Seifert, for introducing me to Zack.

Thank you to the many retailers who have gone above and beyond the call of duty to support Wayward, including Happy Harbor ComicsStrange AdventuresThird Eye Comics, and the Phantom retail group.

Last but not least, thank you to my family and friends. Thank you for listening, sharing, understanding, and patiently accepting stressful days and neurotic nights as we built momentum to get this out the door. None of this would be possible without your love.

We’ve set up a fan email address where you can let us know what you think of Wayward (and we’re compiling the letters page for issue #2 this week, so please send us messages ASAP). Email 
waywardpostage@gmail.com
 and include “OK To Print” with your message if you’re okay with us possibly including your letter in a future issue.

Filed under Wayward image Comics steve cummings creator-owned comic

6 notes

Wayward Launch Party, Wed in Toronto!

WaywardLaunchParty

On Wednesday WAYWARD #1 arrives at comic shops everywhere and Wednesday night we’re throwing an official launch party here in Toronto!

WAYWARD LAUNCH PARTY
WED AUGUST 27th
at GUU SAKABAR
559 Bloor Street West, Toronto
6-8pm (presentation at 7pm)

I’ll be there along with cover artists Alina Urusov, Adam Warren, Kalman Andrasofszky, and Chip Zdarsky. It will probably be the only place where you’ll be able to pick up every variant cover for the first issue (along with a super rare Japanese language doujinshi version and a special cover postcard set) and get them signed at the same time.

Guu Sakabar is an award-winning Japanese izakaya with fantastic food and drink. It’s one of my favorite restaurants in the city and I’m absolutely thrilled to be celebrating the launch there with my dear friends from The Beguiling.

Wayward-Doujinshi-CoverDoujinPage3

Filed under Wayward image Comics Chip Zdarsky kalman andrasofszky alina urusov Guu Sakabar the beguiling

7 notes

Skullkickers #30 arrives in comic shops Wednesday. 30! Hard to believe.Yes, for those wondering, the cover of the issue is a subtle homage to Bengus’ famous Street Fighter promo piece with the alternate characters all in there. Jeffrey Cruz did an incredible job on the cover, and he, Royce Southerland, and Will Hindmarch delivered the goods inside the issue as well.
Here’s a preview of the first 6 pages:
http://all-comic.com/2014/preview-skullkickers-30

Skullkickers #30 arrives in comic shops Wednesday. 30! Hard to believe.

Yes, for those wondering, the cover of the issue is a subtle homage to Bengus’ famous Street Fighter promo piece with the alternate characters all in there. Jeffrey Cruz did an incredible job on the cover, and he, Royce Southerland, and Will Hindmarch delivered the goods inside the issue as well.

Here’s a preview of the first 6 pages:

http://all-comic.com/2014/preview-skullkickers-30

Filed under skullkickers image Comics

2 notes

Anonymous asked: Do you make more money off of print or digital sales? I like supporting in the best way I can.

There isn’t a huge difference, though digital edges out print if you buy it through Image Comic’s DRM-free digital store so that Apple/Google/comiXology don’t take a big chunk of the pie, as broken down in two blog posts I put together.

PRINT SALES:

http://www.jimzub.com/the-reality-of-mainstream-creator-owned-comics/

DIGITAL SALES:

http://www.jimzub.com/okay-but-what-about-digital-comics/

0 notes

matteso586 asked: Care to reveal any original drafts about Klonoa: Dream Traveler of Noctis Sol? For example, how much does Tenebrae know about Klonoa?

The story material I put together for Klonoa is owned by Bandai-Namco and it’s not my place to put that out to the public since I don’t own or control it. Sorry!

5 notes

Anonymous asked: I saw on your blog that the print cost for your single issues is $0.80. If you don't mind me asking - who do you print with?

My pie chart with costs that you’re referencing is a generalization based on a print run of somewhere around 5000 copies printed through a publisher like Image or other professional comic publisher (and also keep in mind that I put together those numbers in 2012). That’s why I noted that these things vary so much and people shouldn’t try to plan their budget based around my chart. There are a LOT of factors that can change the cost of printing/distribution:

-          What kind of printing it is (digital, four color, offset, etc.)

-          How many books you’re printing.

-          Where you’re printing them.

-          How quickly you need them printed.

-          The kind of paper you’re using.

-          Price breaks the printer may give for repeat business or bulk printing.

-          The cost of shipping/fuel/storage.

My creator-owned comics are published by Image and they’re able to aggresively negotiate for better pricing because they print so many different comics each month. They print large runs, many in excess of 5000 copies per title, which lowers the cost per unit a lot, and they provide a lot of repeat business to the printer so they receive additional benefits/discounts.

For someone doing their own self published comics it’s almost impossible to get that cost per unit rate on a small print run if you want a professional-looking product. Print-to-order digital printing can be cost effective but the quality isn’t quite there yet from what I’ve seen.

Yes, that means my pie chart where a comic that sells 5000 copies doesn’t really break even is actually more optimistic than the actual situation most self published comics find themselves in. Scary, right? Welcome to the trials and tribulations of creator-owned comics. That’s why most self-published comics aren’t distributed through Diamond to comic shops; Once the retailer and distributor take their cut there’s nothing left to cover production. Most self-published books are hand sold directly to readers at shows by creators so that, even with that higher print cost, they might be able to make a slim profit.

Needless to say, making comics can be a very expensive hobby before it ever becomes a money-making situation and there are no guarantees.